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French Cooking


Around My French Table: More than 300 Recipes from My Home to Yours

Around My French Table: More than 300 Recipes from My Home to Yours Lowest new price: $18.88
Lowest used price: $8.29
List price: $40.00
Author: Dorie Greenspan
Brand: Dorie Greenspan

When Julia Child told Dorie Greenspan, “You write recipes just the way I do,” she paid her the ultimate compliment. Julia’s praise was echoed by the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, which referred to Dorie’s “wonderfully encouraging voice” and “the sense of a real person who is there to help should you stumble.”
 
Now in a big, personal, and personable book, Dorie captures all the excitement of French home cooking, sharing disarmingly simple dishes she has gathered over years of living in France.
Around My French Table includes many superb renditions of the great classics: a glorious cheese-domed onion soup, a spoon-tender beef daube, and the “top-secret” chocolate mousse recipe that every good Parisian cook knows—but won’t reveal.
 
Hundreds of other recipes are remarkably easy: a cheese and olive quick bread, a three-star chef’s Basque potato tortilla made with a surprise ingredient (potato chips), and an utterly satisfying roast chicken for “lazy people.”
 
Packed with lively stories, memories, and insider tips on French culinary customs, Around My French Table will make cooks fall in love with France all over again, or for the first time.

Fall into Cooking Featured Recipe from Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table: Pumpkin Stuffed with Everything Good

I've got a slideshow of random snapshots that runs as a screensaver on my computer, and every time the picture of pumpkins for sale at Scott’s Farm Stand in Essex, Connecticut, comes up, I smile. In the picture, it’s a sunny day and the pumpkins, scattered higgledy-piggledy across a big field, look like so many roly-poly playthings. Some people might squint and imagine the jack-o-lanterns that many of these pumpkins are destined to become. Me? I see them sitting in the middle of my dining table, their skins burnished from the heat of the oven and their tops mounded with bubbly cheese and cream. Ever since Catherine, a friend of mine in Lyon, France, told me about how she and her family stuff pumpkins with bread and cheese and bacon and garlic and herbs and cream, I can’t look at a pumpkin on either side of the Atlantic without thinking, "Dinner!"

Of course, pumpkins are a New World vegetable, but I’m seeing them more and more in the Paris markets, which means I’m making this dish more and more wherever I am. It’s less a recipe than an arts and crafts project; less a formula than a template to play with and make your own.

Basically—and it’s really very basic— you hollow out a small pumpkin, just as you would for a jack-o-lantern, salt and pepper the inside, and then start filling it up. My standard recipe, the one Catherine sent to me, involves seasoning chunks of stale bread, tossing them with bacon and garlic, cubes of cheese (when I’m in France, I use Gruyere or Emmenthal; when I’m in the States, I opt for cheddar) and some herbs, packing the pumpkin with this mix and then pouring in enough cream to moisten it all.

But there’s nothing to stop you from using leftover cooked rice instead of bread--I did that one night and it was risotto-like and fabulous--or from adding dried fruit and chopped nuts, cooked spinach or Swiss chard, or apples or pears, fall’s favored fruits. And I was crazy about the dish when I stirred some cooked hot sausage meat into the mix.

The possibilities for improvisation don’t end with the filling: You’ve got a choice about the way to serve this beauty. I think you should always bring it to the table whole--you wouldn’t want to deprive your guests of the chance to ooh and aah--but whether you should slice or scoop is up to you. If you serve it in slices, you get a wedge of pumpkin piled high with the filling, and that’s pretty dramatic (if something this rustic can be called 'dramatic'). The wedge serving is best eaten with a knife and fork (or knife and spoon). If you scoop, what you do is reach into the pumpkin with a big spoon, scrape the cooked pumpkin meat from the sides of the pumpkin into the center, and stir everything around. Do this and you’ll have a kind of mash--not so pretty, but so delicious.

Catherine serves it scooped. I serve it sliced sometimes and scooped others. Either way, I can’t imagine this won’t become an instant fall favorite chez you. --Dorie Greenspan

Makes 2 very generous servings or 4 more genteel servings

You might consider serving this alongside the Thanksgiving turkey or even instead of it--omit the bacon and you’ve got a great vegetarian main course.

Ingredients

1 pumpkin, about 3 pounds
Salt and freshly ground pepper
¼ pound stale bread, thinly sliced and cut into ½-inch chunks
¼ pound cheese, such as Gruyère, Emmenthal, cheddar, or a combination, cut into ½-inch chunks
2–4 garlic cloves (to taste), split, germ removed, and coarsely chopped
4 strips bacon, cooked until crisp, drained, and chopped
About ¼ cup snipped fresh chives or sliced scallions
1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme
About 1/3 cup heavy cream
Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with a silicone baking mat or parchment, or find a Dutch oven with a diameter that’s just a tiny bit larger than your pumpkin. If you bake the pumpkin in a casserole, it will keep its shape, but it might stick to the casserole, so you’ll have to serve it from the pot — which is an appealingly homey way to serve it. If you bake it on a baking sheet, you can present it freestanding, but maneuvering a heavy stuffed pumpkin with a softened shell isn’t so easy. However, since I love the way the unencumbered pumpkin looks in the center of the table, I’ve always taken my chances with the baked-on-a-sheet method, and so far, I’ve been lucky.

Using a very sturdy knife--and caution--cut a cap out of the top of the pumpkin (think Halloween jack-o’-lantern). It’s easiest to work your knife around the top of the pumpkin at a 45-degree angle. You want to cut off enough of the top to make it easy for you to work inside the pumpkin. Clear away the seeds and strings from the cap and from inside the pumpkin. Season the inside of the pumpkin generously with salt and pepper, and put it on the baking sheet or in the pot.

Toss the bread, cheese, garlic, bacon, and herbs together in a bowl. Season with pepper--you probably have enough salt from the bacon and cheese, but taste to be sure--and pack the mix into the pumpkin. The pumpkin should be well filled--you might have a little too much filling, or you might need to add to it. Stir the cream with the nutmeg and some salt and pepper and pour it into the pumpkin. Again, you might have too much or too little--you don’t want the ingredients to swim in cream, but you do want them nicely moistened. (But it’s hard to go wrong here.)

Put the cap in place and bake the pumpkin for about 2 hours--check after 90 minutes--or until everything inside the pumpkin is bubbling and the flesh of the pumpkin is tender enough to be pierced easily with the tip of a knife. Because the pumpkin will have exuded liquid, I like to remove the cap during the last 20 minutes or so, so that the liquid can bake away and the top of the stuffing can brown a little.

When the pumpkin is ready, carefully, very carefully--it’s heavy, hot, and wobbly--bring it to the table or transfer it to a platter that you’ll bring to the table.

Storing
It’s really best to eat this as soon as it’s ready. However, if you’ve got leftovers, you can scoop them out of the pumpkin, mix them up, cover, and chill them; reheat them the next day.

Fall into Cooking Featured Recipe from Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table: Marie-Helene's Apple Cake

I remember once trying to teach a French friend of mine the expression, "as American as apple pie." After I’d explained what pie was, I thought the rest would be easy..but not exactly.

"I don’t understand," she said, "we have apples, too, and we make delicious desserts with them. Why couldn’t we say, 'As French as tarte Tatin?'"

I certainly wasn’t going to argue with her, especially when she was right about all the delicious desserts the French make with apples.

One of my favorites is one that’s not anywhere near as well known as the upside-down tarte Tatin. Actually, I don’t think it has a formal name of any kind. I dubbed it Marie-Hélène’s Apple Cake because it was my Parisian friend, Marie-Hélène Brunet-Lhoste, who first made it for me. Marie-Hélène spends her weekends in Normandy, the land of cream, butter, Brie, and apples, and the cake she made had apples she’d picked from her backyard that afternoon.

I call this dessert a cake, mostly because I don’t know what else to call it. The rum-and-vanilla-scented batter is less cakey than custardy. And there’s only enough of it to surround the apples. It’s a very homey, almost rustic cake and it’s good no matter what kinds of apples you use. In fact, when I asked Marie-Hélène which apples she used, she said she didn’t know--she just used whatever she had.

The cake is extremely easy to make (foolproof, really, you just whisk the ingredients together in a bowl), satisfying, fragrant (I love the way the house smells when it’s in the oven) and appealing in an autumn-in-the-country kind of way.

It may be as French as can be, but it’s become this American’s favorite. I hope you’ll like it too. Now’s certainly the time for it. --Dorie Greenspan

Makes 8 servings

Ingredients

¾ cup all-purpose flour
¾ teaspoon baking powder
Pinch of salt
4 large apples (if you can, choose 4 different kinds)
2 large eggs
¾ cup sugar
3 tablespoons dark rum
½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Generously butter an 8-inch springform pan and put it on a baking sheet lined with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper.

Whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt together in small bowl.

Peel the apples, cut them in half and remove the cores. Cut the apples into 1- to 2-inch chunks.

In a medium bowl, beat the eggs with a whisk until they’re foamy. Pour in the sugar and whisk for a minute or so to blend. Whisk in the rum and vanilla. Whisk in half the flour and when it is incorporated, add half the melted butter, followed by the rest of the flour and the remaining butter, mixing gently after each addition so that you have a smooth, rather thick batter. Switch to a rubber spatula and fold in the apples, turning the fruit so that it’s coated with batter. Scrape the mix into the pan and poke it around a little with the spatula so that it’s evenish.

Slide the pan into the oven and bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until the top of the cake is golden brown and a knife inserted deep into the center comes out clean; the cake may pull away from the sides of the pan. Transfer to a cooling rack and let rest for 5 minutes.

Carefully run a blunt knife around the edges of the cake and remove the sides of the springform pan. (Open the springform slowly, and before it’s fully opened, make sure there aren’t any apples stuck to it.) Allow the cake to cool until it is just slightly warm or at room temperature. If you want to remove the cake from the bottom of the springform pan, wait until the cake is almost cooled, then run a long spatula between the cake and the pan, cover the top of the cake with a piece of parchment or wax paper, and invert it onto a rack. Carefully remove the bottom of the pan and turn the cake over onto a serving dish.

Serving
The cake can be served warm or at room temperature, with or without a little softly whipped, barely sweetened heavy cream or a spoonful of ice cream. Marie-Hélène served her cake with cinnamon ice cream and it was a terrific combination.

Storing
The cake will keep for about 2 days at room temperature and, according to my husband, gets more comforting with each passing day. However long you keep the cake, it’s best not to cover it — it’s too moist. Leave the cake on its plate and just press a piece of plastic wrap or wax paper against the cut surfaces.


Features:

  • hardback
  • Dorie Greenspan
  • 0618875530
  • Around My French Table: More Than 300 Recipes from My Home

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French Country Cooking: Meals and Moments from a Village in the Vineyards

French Country Cooking: Meals and Moments from a Village in the Vineyards Lowest new price: $22.39
Lowest used price: $19.99
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Author: Mimi Thorisson
Brand: Clarkson Potter Publishers

A captivating journey through off-the-beaten-path French wine country with 100 simple yet exquisite recipes, 150 sumptuous photographs, and stories inspired by life in a small village. 

“Francophiles, this book is pure Gallic food porn.” —The Wall Street Journal  

Readers everywhere fell in love with Mimi Thorisson, her family, and their band of smooth fox terriers through her blog, Manger, and debut cookbook, A Kitchen in France. In French Country Cooking, the family moves to an abandoned old château in Médoc. While shopping for local ingredients, cooking, and renovating the house, Mimi meets the farmers and artisans who populate the village and learns about the former owner of the house, an accomplished local cook. Here are recipes inspired by this eccentric cast of characters, including White Asparagus Soufflé, Wine Harvest Pot au Feu, Endives with Ham, and Salted Butter Chocolate Cake. Featuring evocative photographs taken by Mimi’s husband, Oddur Thorisson, and illustrated endpapers, this cookbook is a charming jaunt to an untouched corner of France that has thus far eluded the spotlight.

Features:

  • Clarkson Potter Publishers

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Simple French Food 40th Anniversary Edition

Simple French Food 40th Anniversary Edition Lowest new price: $13.85
Lowest used price: $12.95
List price: $24.99
Author: Richard Olney
Brand: Richard Olney

Richard Olney was considered a culinary genius for his ability to elevate cooking to a practical art. He wrote evocatively about the beauty and pleasure in cooking by focusing on preparing simple foods well. This new edition of his classic cookbook includes a fresh cover, new interior design, and a foreword by Mark Bittman?so that a whole new generation of food lovers can enjoy this inspiring book. Olney?s 175 recipes are so straightforward that cooks will be inspired to go right into the kitchen: herb omelets, fish with zucchini, lamb shanks with garlic, and many more. He also shares techniques (several featuring his own illustrations), such as fermenting vinegar, in line with the back-to-basics trend in cooking. Olney?s emphasis on simplicity and improvisation in cooking will resonate with today?s cooks and food lovers.

Features:

  • Simple French Food 40th Anniversary Edition

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A Kitchen in France: A Year of Cooking in My Farmhouse

A Kitchen in France: A Year of Cooking in My Farmhouse Lowest new price: $18.95
Lowest used price: $15.99
List price: $40.00
Author: Mimi Thorisson
Brand: Mimi Thorisson

With beguiling recipes and sumptuous photography, A Kitchen in France transports readers to the French countryside and marks the debut of a captivating new voice in cooking.

"This is real food: delicious, honest recipes that celebrate the beauty of picking what is ripe and in season, and capture the essence of life in rural France."
—Alice Waters

When Mimi Thorisson and her family moved from Paris to a small town in out-of-the-way Médoc, she did not quite know what was in store for them. She found wonderful ingredients—from local farmers and the neighboring woods—and, most important, time to cook. Her cookbook chronicles the family’s seasonal meals and life in an old farmhouse, all photographed by her husband, Oddur. Mimi’s convivial recipes—such as Roast Chicken with Herbs and Crème Fraîche, Cèpe and Parsley Tartlets, Winter Vegetable Cocotte, Apple Tart with Orange Flower Water, and Salted Butter Crème Caramel—will bring the warmth of rural France into your home.

Featured Recipes from A Kitchen in France

Cèpe and Parsley Tartlets
Download the recipe for Cèpe and Parsley Tartlets
Pumpkin Soup
Download the recipe for Pumpkin Soup
Vegetable Tian
Download the recipe for Vegetable Tian

Features:

  • A Kitchen in France A Year of Cooking in My Farmhouse

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Pâtisserie Gluten Free: The Art of French Pastry: Cookies, Tarts, Cakes, and Puff Pastries

Pâtisserie Gluten Free: The Art of French Pastry: Cookies, Tarts, Cakes, and Puff Pastries Lowest new price: $15.29
Lowest used price: $17.56
List price: $24.99
Author: Patricia Austin
Brand: Austin Patricia

tisserie Gluten Free offers a tantalizing collection of gluten-free recipes. This beautifully photographed cookbook is unique in presenting some of the most challenging treats to make without gluten: classic French pastries.Written with meticulous detail and a warm and inviting style, ;tisserie Gluten Free includes a wide array of recipes, ranging from delightful buttery French cookies to the ooh là là of elaborate flaky puff pastries.The recipes skip the commonly used gluten-free binders—xanthan gum and guar gum— that are known to be of digestive sensitivity for many individuals. The takeaway is an elevated experience in gluten-free baking; from chocolate sea salt sablés to almond croissants, the results surprise and bring a smile to the staunchest of gluten-free skeptics.

Features:

  • Patisserie Gluten Free The Art of French Pastry Cookies Tarts Cakes and Puff Pastries

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Voilà!: The Effortless French Cookbook: Easy Recipes to Savor the Classic Tastes of France

Voilà!: The Effortless French Cookbook: Easy Recipes to Savor the Classic Tastes of France Lowest new price: $11.29
Lowest used price: $8.00
List price: $17.99
Author: Cecile Delarue

"Classic, simple, foolproof, and seasonal recipes enable you to eat French style in the comfort of your own home―without borders. Voilà! Effortless French Cookbook makes me want to cook."
―Mireille Guiliano, author of French Women Don’t Get Fat

To enjoy the essence of authentic French cuisine, you don’t have to get on a plane or take a 5-star Michelin cooking class. All you need is Voilà! Effortless French Cookbook and a passion for the delights of classic French fare. Join Cécile Delarue, creator of the food blog French and Parfait, as she shares her tried-and-true French recipes, as well as her tips for creating elegant French meals on the average American dime.

Fun and easy-to-follow, Voilà! Effortless French Cookbook offers:

  • A preparatory chapter that recreates a Parisian cooking class will teach you the basic skills of traditional French cooking
  • More than 125 classic French recipes with wine pairings deliver plenty of options―without fussing over gourmet ingredients or a celebrity chef's personal tips
  • Chapter upon chapter of delicious French staples to help you get savvy about sauces, poach the perfect egg, and bake the best tartines and quiches

Enjoying the French meals you love shouldn’t be complicated―and Voilà! Effortless French Cookbook is the only French cookbook that proves they don’t have to be. Even if you’ve never cooked French food before, you’ll be saying bonjour to the simple pleasures of French cuisine, and au revoir to the hassle of intricate recipes with Voilà! Effortless French Cookbook.

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Tasting Paris: 100 Recipes to Eat Like a Local

Tasting Paris: 100 Recipes to Eat Like a Local Lowest new price: $19.49
List price: $30.00
Author: Clotilde Dusoulier

Tasting Paris features new and classic French recipes and cooking techniques that will demistify the art of French cooking and transport your dinner guests to Paris. Whether you have experienced the charm of Paris many times or dream of planning your first trip, here you will find the food that makes this city so beloved. Featuring classic recipes like Roast Chicken with Herbed Butter and Croutons, and Profiteroles, as well as newer dishes that reflect the way Parisians eat today, such as Ratatouille Pita Sandwich with Chopped Eggs and Tahini Sauce and Spiralized Zucchini Salad with Peach and Green Almonds. With 100 recipes, 125 evocative photographs, and native Parisian Clotilde Dusoulier’s expertise, Tasting Paris transports you to picnicking along the Seine, shopping the robust open-air markets, and finding the best street food—bringing the flavors and allure of this favorite culinary destination to your very own kitchen.

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The Essential Thomas Keller: The French Laundry Cookbook & Ad Hoc at Home [Box Set] [Hardcover]

The Essential Thomas Keller: The French Laundry Cookbook & Ad Hoc at Home [Box Set] [Hardcover] Lowest new price: $49.99
Lowest used price: $41.11
List price: $100.00
Author: Thomas Keller
Brand: Artisan

Two award-winning books in one box offer a lifetime of learning for anyone who loves fine food.

 From two acclaimed restaurants came two of the most acclaimed, award-winning cookbooks ever published―now packaged together in a luxurious slipcased boxed set, the ideal holiday gift for any food lover. 

First there was French Laundry in Napa Valley, setting a new standard for American fine dining. Then there was The French Laundry Cookbook, setting a new standard for American cookbooks. In 2006, Chef Keller opened Ad Hoc, his casual family-style restaurant that serves a single menu a day, and that restaurant, too, gave birth to a groundbreaking cookbook, in fact a New York Times best seller.

Whereas Ad Hoc at Home offers a huge happiness-inducing collection of family-style recipes that includes lunch-counter favorites―lemon meringue and cherry pie; such classics as Buttermilk Fried Chicken and Herbed Rack of Lamb, plus Thomas’s mom’s coconut cake and his dad’s favorite meatballs―The French Laundry Cookbook is a culinary ode to finesse. Every recipe in it has become a classic: from Keller’s Salmon Cornets to his Oysters and Pearls and Butter-Poached Lobster. From the casual but carefully considered food of Ad Hoc at Home to The French Laundry Cookbook’s recipes at their most refined, this is cooking that delivers in taste, and makes us all better cooks.

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  • Artisan

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The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book

The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book Lowest new price: $7.50
Lowest used price: $2.66
List price: $14.99
Author: Alice B. Toklas
Brand: Harper Perennial

“A book of character, fine food and tasty human observation."
The New Yorker

 

Featuring the recipes and memories of Alice B. Toklas—a prominent American expat who lived in France and was Gertrude Stein’s lover—The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book is a precursor to the classic works of famed French chefs Julia Child and M.F.K. Fisher , and stands alongside Stein’s The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas as a celebration of the fascinating life and times of the woman James Beard called, “one of the really great cooks of all time.”

Features:

  • Harper Perennial

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The Food Lover's Guide to Paris: The Best Restaurants, Bistros, Cafés, Markets, Bakeries, and More

The Food Lover's Guide to Paris: The Best Restaurants, Bistros, Cafés, Markets, Bakeries, and More Lowest new price: $5.99
Lowest used price: $2.71
List price: $16.95
Author: Patricia Wells
Brand: Patricia Wells

The book that cracks the code, from the incomparable Patricia Wells. An acclaimed authority on French cuisine, Ms. Wells has spent more than 30 years in Paris, many as former restaurant critic for The International Herald Tribune. Now her revered Food Lover’s Guide to Paris is back in a completely revised, brand-new edition.

In 457 entries―345 new to this edition, plus 112 revisited and reviewed classics―The Food Lover’s Guide to Paris offers an elegantly written go-to guide to the very best restaurants, cafés, wine bars, and bistros in Paris, as well as where to find the flakiest croissants, earthiest charcuteries, sublimest cheese, most ethereal macarons, and impeccable outdoor markets. The genius of the book is Ms. Wells’s meritocratic spirit. Whether you’re looking for a before-you-die Michelin three-star experience (Guy Savoy, perhaps, or Restaurant Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée) or wanting to sample the new bistronomy (Bistrot Paul Bert, Le Comptoir du Relais) or craving something simple and perfect (L’As du Fallafel, or Breizh Café for crêpes), Patricia Wells tells you exactly where to go and why you should go there. You no longer have to rely on the iffy “reviews” of Yelp or Trip Advisor.

Included are 40 recipes from some of her favorite chefs and purveyors and, of course, all the practical information: addresses, websites, email, hours, closest métro stop, specialties, and more.

Let's face it. Finding the best of the fabled cuisine in Paris can be difficult for us Americans. We're thrown off by the language, the numerous terms for eateries, and the French themselves, who love to pretend they don't speak English.

That's why Patricia Wells's updated guide, now in its fourth edition, is a hit. With detailed information on 450 restaurants, Wells takes readers by the hand and demystifies the culture so well known for its luscious food and demanding gourmands. Sidebars abound: she dissects breads, foie gras, and oysters--and even gives the cultural background on why the French may drink wine in the morning (to kill worms, of course), as well as discussing the pros and cons of eating the rinds of cheeses. Also listed are the best bakeries, cafés, and specialty shops, as well as 50 recipes to try at home.

If there is a criticism to be made of this sturdy and informative book, it's of the writing of this International Herald Tribune critic, which is sometimes riddled with stock descriptions and clichés. Yet readers are likely to forgive her this occasional foible, as Wells's interesting details and enthusiasm are enough to send devout Italophiles, even, to Paris--where they can sink their teeth into those crusty baguettes. --Melissa Rossi

Features:

  • The Food Lover s Guide to Paris The Best Restaurants Bistros Cafes Markets Bakeries and More

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